FAQ’s


How do I know if I am registered for the NDIS?

If you have previously been funded on grant or individualised funding from Disability Services Qld (DSQ) you will already be on the register for NDIS.
If you haven’t been funded in this manner, you can contact NDIA prior to roll out in your area and register yourself. We have been advised that, even if you are receiving DSQ funding, you should still contact the NDIA to ensure you are on the register as only certain packages will be automatically registered.


What is a LAC?

A Local Area Coordinator (LAC) is a company who has been assessed by NDIA, who will perform a role like the Disability Services Qld Case Manager. They will liaise with you to develop your plan, help you find providers for that plan, and they will work with you if your plan needs changing or reviewing. The LAC providers are decided by region, and the NDIA has determined that Carers Qld will be the LAC for the whole of South East Qld.


What is the first step of getting onto the NDIS?

Someone representing the National Disability Insurance Scheme will call asking if you want to transition to the NDIS. Please let us know once this has happened, so we can ensure you have all the correct information ready for your first meeting.


Do I have to meet with them on my own?

A. No. You can have someone with you at your planning meeting that will support you. If you would like Your Home Care to be an advocate at your planning meeting, please contact the office and we will discuss with you who the best person is to provide that support.

What is a nominee?

A. A nominee is a person who is appointed in writing, at the request of a participant, or on the initiative of the NDIA, to act on behalf of, or make decisions on behalf of a participant for the purposes of the NDIS Act. Nominees play an important role in the NDIS to represent the interest of the participant. Most participants of the NDIS will not require a nominee. The NDIS focusses on supporting and building the capacity of participants to make their own decisions whilst acknowledging the role that families, carers or significant others play.

Can I provide limited access to my nominees to act on my behalf?

Two types of nominees can be appointed under the NDIS Act, these are a plan nominee and a correspondence nominee. There are limitations to the role of plan nominee which is explained under the heading below.

 

What is a Plan Nominee?

A Plan Nominee can make decisions on behalf of the participant, for the purposes of, the NDIS Act that relates to the preparation, review or replacement of the participant’s plan and/or, the management of the funding for supports under the participant’s plan.

 

What is a Correspondence Nominee?

The role of a Correspondence Nominee is narrower than the role of a Plan Nominee. A Correspondence Nominee can receive letters and notifications from the NDIA and/or make requests for information to the NDIA on behalf of the participant.

 

How do I appoint a nominee to act on my behalf?

For the NDIS to appoint a nominee, the NDIA needs to be satisfied the participant requires a nominee.
They will take into consideration the wishes (if any) of the participant regarding the making of the appointment including written consent (in most cases) and provide a copy of the letter for the appointment of the nominee to the nominee and the participant.
To request a nominee appointment, you should speak with your local area coordinator or contact your local NDIA office and they can discuss this with you and obtain any relevant information.

Does a person need to be on Disability Support and Carer’s Pension to qualify for NDIS?

You do not need to be receiving a Disability Support Pension (DSP) to be eligible for the NDIS. The DSP and carer’s pension are separate from the NDIS. The NDIS is designed to work alongside the DSP and other measures, which provide income replacement for people with disability who cannot work.
Assistance from the NDIS is not means tested and has no impact on income support such as the Disability Support Pension and Carers Allowance. While both the DSP and the NDIS provide support for people with disability, they perform very different functions and have different assessment criteria.

Do I need to give the NDIS a quote for assistive technology such as (AFOs) before my planning meeting?

No, you will not need to provide the NDIS with a quote for supports such as assistive technology prior to your planning conversation. To develop your first plan, you (and/or your nominee) will have a planning conversation with an NDIA representative about your existing supports, your immediate needs and your main goals. Assistive technology (AT) will be included in your plan if it is identified as a reasonable and necessary support to meet your needs and achieve your goals.

Does the NDIS cover mental health conditions as well? I’ve seen posts about people being covered for depression.

Yes. The NDIS does cover mental health but they use the term psychosocial disability (PDF) to describe any functional impairment, arising from mental health issues.
While not everyone with a mental health condition will experience psychosocial disability, those who do can experience severe effects and social disadvantage. People with a significant disability – one likely to be permanent – may qualify for NDIS support. If they don’t qualify, the NDIS will link them to appropriate supports in their local community.

How does the NDIS figure out how much funding you get in your plan?

NDIS plans are tailored to each person’s individual needs so funding will vary, depending on the person’s support needs. When you meet with an NDIS representative, to develop your plan, you will be asked about your current situation and what supports you receive, and how you manage everyday activities, like taking a shower or cooking your meals.
This information helps to form the basis of your plan, working out your supports; how they are reasonable and necessary; how they link to your immediate needs, and how the NDIS can help you to work towards achieving your goals. Once you complete the planning process you will receive an individualised funding amount, which you have choice and control over the supports you receive.

What are the differences between being plan-managed and self-managed?

When we talk about managing a plan, we mean the way you manage the financial transactions involved with accessing supports as part of your plan. There are four ways to manage plan budgets:
1. Self-managed budgets- Self-managing your plan means the NDIS will pay you directly for the supports you claim under your plan’s budgets. Being self-managed allows you to choose any provider, whether they are registered with the NDIS or not. Find out more about how self-managing your plan works in the self-managing your plan factsheet.
2. Agency-managed budgets – When the NDIA manages your plan, the NDIS will directly pay your support providers for you. You must choose registered NDIS providers if the NDIA manages your plan.
3. Plan Management – If it’s the best option for you, you may have funding for a Plan Management service provider included in your plan. In this situation, the NDIS will pay your Plan Manager, who will directly pay for all supports you have asked them to manage.
4. Combination of the above three options can be used together. No matter which option you choose, you remain in control of which support providers you ultimately choose and engage.

Does Centrelink’s Mobility Allowance cease once you receive transport-related funding from the NDIS?

Your NDIS plan will include any supports that the NDIS will fund, including any reasonable and necessary transport-related funded supports. If you are receiving Mobility Allowance when you receive an approved NDIS plan, your eligibility for the Mobility Allowance payment ceases.

Once you are accepted into the NDIS, is it 100 per cent for life or can you exit the Scheme? I am an adult.

Once you are accepted as an NDIS participant, you will receive reasonable and necessary support for as long as you need it. For most participants this means a lifelong relationship.
The NDIA will work with you to develop a plan that is unique to your needs and is based on your goals, and it will change over time as your situation changes. Some people enter the Scheme under early intervention. Early intervention support is available to both children and adults who meet the early intervention requirements.
The aim of early intervention is to alleviate the impact of a person’s impairment by providing support at the earliest possible stage. This means that support will be given to increase your independence and capacity, so at some stage you can transition from the NDIS to mainstream services (services available to all Australians).
Achieving good outcomes early on and transitioning from the Scheme doesn’t have to mean the end of your relationship with the NDIS. You might need support at some point in the future, and that’s okay.

What are the differences between being plan-managed and self-managed?

When we talk about managing a plan, we mean the way you manage the financial transactions involved with accessing supports as part of your plan. There are four ways to manage plan budgets:
1. Self-managed budgets – Self-managing your plan means the NDIS will pay you directly for the supports you claim under your plan’s budgets. Being self-managed allows you to choose any provider, whether they are registered with the NDIS or not. Find out more about how self-managing your plan works in the self-managing your plan factsheet by clicking here.
2. Agency-managed budgets – When the NDIA manages your plan, the NDIS will directly pay your support providers for you. You have to choose registered NDIS providers if the NDIA manages your plan.
3. Plan Management – If it’s the best option for you, you may have funding for a Plan Management service provider included in your plan. In this situation, the NDIS will pay your Plan Manager, who will directly pay for all supports you have asked them to manage.
4. A combination of the above three options can be used together. No matter which option you choose, you remain in control of which support providers you ultimately choose and engage.

Does Centrelink’s Mobility Allowance cease once you receive transport-related funding from the NDIS?

A. Your NDIS plan will include any supports that the NDIS will fund, including any reasonable and necessary transport-related funded supports. If you are receiving Mobility Allowance when you receive an approved NDIS plan, your eligibility for the Mobility Allowance payment ceases.

Once you are accepted into the NDIS, is it 100 per cent for life or can you exit the Scheme? I am an adult.

Once you are accepted as an NDIS participant, you will receive reasonable and necessary support for as long as you need it. For most participants, this means a lifelong relationship.

We will work with you to develop a plan that is unique to your needs and is based on your goals, and it will change over time as your situation changes. Some people enter the Scheme under early intervention. Early intervention support is available to both children and adults who meet the early intervention requirements.

The aim of early intervention is to alleviate the impact of a person’s impairment by providing support at the earliest possible stage. This means that support will be given to increase your independence and capacity, so at some stage, you can transition from the NDIS to mainstream services (services available to all Australians).

Achieving good outcomes early on and transitioning from the Scheme doesn’t have to mean the end of your relationship with the NDIS. You might need support at some point in the future, and that’s okay.

Do I need to give the NDIS a quote for assistive technology such as (AFOs) before my planning meeting?

No, you will not need to provide the NDIS with a quote for supports such as Assistive Technology (AT) prior to your planning conversation. To develop your first plan, you (and/or your nominee) will have a planning conversation with an NDIA representative about your existing supports, your immediate needs, and your main goals.

AT will be included in your plan if it is identified as a reasonable and necessary support to meet your needs and achieve your goals. You can find out more about how to prepare for your first plan on our website. Once your plan is finalised, the NDIS will work with you to implement your plan.

Some assistive technology supports, such as ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs), may require quotes to implement your plan. You can find out more about how to manage your assistive technology supports on the Assistive Technology FAQs page which can be found by clicking here. 

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